Author Topic: My new full-sus!  (Read 1720 times)

RI_James

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My new full-sus!
« on: September 30, 2013, 04:01:32 PM »
Hey! Some of you might have noticed the thread beneath, outlining the theft of the last bike I owned. So here is a shot of my new Proceed FS Trail, which I've had for about three weeks. Been doing some tinkering around with it, haven't made many significant changes since the bike was custom built to a really decent spec by the last owner, I've added the Neoguard and Ritchey foam grips, also re-arranged the headset spacers to bring the bars a tad higher. Nothing new other than that.


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I'm really pleased with this bike, although I'm far from hot shit on the trails so don't assume the bike defines the rider. One thing I do want some help with is just being able to learn to better service my bike from home and understand more complex bike mechanics with it.

Got Rockshox Domain 160-180mm front forks, and a Manitou Radium Expert rear air shock. Both work really well, I normally take full advantage of the adjustments in the front, but ideally I want to upgrade the rear shock in about six months or so. What methods are there for measuring the full travel adjustability of the frame? I remember reading that you can't always guage the rear travel by the size of the shock, because the travel will be defined by the allowance for movement in the frame and swing arm, not always the size of the shock fitted itself. By this logic, would it be sensible to assume that some bikes might be fitted with a type of suspension set up that is actually lower than the full potential for travel in the whole frame?

Proceed don't have a huge deal of information on their bikes, their official website is still pending and I haven't been able to find a decent source for finding out the exact frame dimensions and details of the model I have.

Anybody here ever used a Manitou Radium shock before? I'd like some help re-calibrating the weight ratios in the shock to my own weight on the bike. It feels fairly responsive, still there isn't much movement when riding seated. When standing up and properly throwing weight into the back it does tend to open up the shock, and it feels fairly secure and off jumps and small kickers and things. I want to know how far I could take it before breaking it? Chris from The Hub told me, ideally most riders should be looking to bottom out their rear shock at least once a ride, and I didn't quite know how to respond to that. Is that true, the natural assumption would be that it depreciates the long-term value of the shock but I don't quite know enough to properly comment. I'll save myself the embarrasment of assuming how most of these components actually function, but my main curiosity is so I can have a better understanding of exactly how much abuse the shock will tolerate once it's properly balanced.

Some problems with the gears which make it difficult to change accurately everytime, ie: skipping gears, sometimes ineffectual in the changes, requiring 2-3 clicks to move onto the higher/lower sprocket. Often a nag to get off the bigger of the two chain-rings as well, and really stiff changing from lower to higher ring. What's the best way to deal with these kinds of problems? I have all the tools and space necessary to service it from home, but I'd prefer some solid advice before potential fucking things up. So thanks for any input and help, see you all soon!

James.


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Paul

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Re: My new full-sus!
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2013, 04:11:12 PM »
Nice looking bike there James! look forward to riding with you soon mate! :)
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RI_James

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Re: My new full-sus!
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2013, 04:15:18 PM »
Yeah, man. Give us a text whenever you wanna hit Penllergaer again! Some nice riding up around Tir Coed woods and Bont Mountains for XC.
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Brendawg

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Re: My new full-sus!
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2013, 07:22:07 PM »
If you're gonna replace the shock, make sure you get the same size shock to replace it. Measure the eye to eye length and the stroke length. Whilst you can change the travel by using a longer / shorter stroke shock, chances are you'll ruin the handling of the bike. Too long a shock will raise the BB and tighten the head angle, making the bike twitchy. Too short a shock will drop the BB too far and slacken the head angle, making pedal strikes on obstacles more likely and making the handling sluggish at low speed.

To set it up, add a few PSI at a time using a shock pump and sit on the bike in full riding gear to measure sag. You should be aiming for 25-33% sag. If you get too little sag, let out a few psi at a time. Putting an O-ring around the shaft will help to measure the sag.

Shocks tend not to have much second hand value, as they only fit a handful of frames, so don't worry about bottoming it out once a ride.

As for the gears, use the barrel adjusters on the shifters. Tighten or loosen them 1 click at a time and then check the indexing by shifting up and down the gears.

If you're not sure about doing any of this, take it back to the hub, they should be able to sort it.
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Re: My new full-sus!
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2013, 08:48:38 PM »
If you're gonna replace the shock, make sure you get the same size shock to replace it. Measure the eye to eye length and the stroke length. Whilst you can change the travel by using a longer / shorter stroke shock, chances are you'll ruin the handling of the bike. Too long a shock will raise the BB and tighten the head angle, making the bike twitchy. Too short a shock will drop the BB too far and slacken the head angle, making pedal strikes on obstacles more likely and making the handling sluggish at low speed.

To set it up, add a few PSI at a time using a shock pump and sit on the bike in full riding gear to measure sag. You should be aiming for 25-33% sag. If you get too little sag, let out a few psi at a time. Putting an O-ring around the shaft will help to measure the sag.


Ditto to what Brendan said !!

Shocks tend not to have much second hand value, as they only fit a handful of frames, so don't worry about bottoming it out once a ride.

As for the gears, use the barrel adjusters on the shifters. Tighten or loosen them 1 click at a time and then check the indexing by shifting up and down the gears.

If you're not sure about doing any of this, take it back to the hub, they should be able to sort it.
Planning on living forever .... So far so good !!

RI_James

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Re: My new full-sus!
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2013, 09:42:05 AM »
Thanks, guys. Will have a closer look when I get home this evening.
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Paul

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Re: My new full-sus!
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2013, 11:42:18 AM »
Yeah, man. Give us a text whenever you wanna hit Penllergaer again! Some nice riding up around Tir Coed woods and Bont Mountains for XC.

Got some crap shifts this week,but off every day next week,will sort something out mate  :)
You only need two tools in life - wd-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and should, use the wd-40. If it shouldn't move and does, use the duct tape.